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8/20/2013 8:59 AM | ELIZA BARCLAY | NPR |
Ask about the foods that have conquered the world and you're likely to hear about Coca-Cola and McDonald's Big Macs.   But the most successful industrial food ever produced flies far under the radar. And it has finally been outed by three anthropologists in a fascinating new book, The Noodle Narratives, which analyzes the precipitous rise ? or "brilliant career," as the authors say ? of instant ramen, from its birth in postwar Japan to its sales of just over 100 billion servings worldwide in 2012.

Ask about the foods that have conquered the world and you're likely to hear about Coca-Cola and McDonald's Big Macs.

But the most successful industrial food ever produced flies far under the radar. And it has finally been outed by three anthropologists in a fascinating new book, The Noodle Narratives, which analyzes the precipitous rise – or "brilliant career," as the authors say — of instant ramen, from its birth in postwar Japan to its sales of just over 100 billion servings worldwide in 2012.

8/13/2013 7:58 AM | CARRIE FEIBEL | NPR |
Medical entrepreneurs are remaking the emergency room experience. They're pulling the emergency room out of the hospital and planting it in the strip mall.   It's called a "free-standing ER," and some 400 of them have opened across the country in the past four years.

Medical entrepreneurs are remaking the emergency room experience. They're pulling the emergency room out of the hospital and planting it in the strip mall.

It's called a "free-standing ER," and some 400 of them have opened across the country in the past four years.

8/8/2013 8:30 AM | DEBORAH FRANKLIN | NPR |
In a cool bit of science they recently published in the journal mBio, the researchers describe how they created a microbial community in a lab dish that mimics what happens in the lining of the human nose and upper throat.   Normally S. pneumoniae bacteria organize themselves there into a stable and highly structured slick, or biofilm, with other microbes, Hakansson says. "You'll see towers growing up," he says, "with channels coming down for water and nutrients," all layered atop the human cells.

In a cool bit of science they recently published in the journal mBio, the researchers describe how they created a microbial community in a lab dish that mimics what happens in the lining of the human nose and upper throat.

Normally S. pneumoniae bacteria organize themselves there into a stable and highly structured slick, or biofilm, with other microbes, Hakansson says. "You'll see towers growing up," he says, "with channels coming down for water and nutrients," all layered atop the human cells.

8/7/2013 9:38 AM | Elise Hu | NPR |
In our "Weekly Innovation" blog series, we explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Previously we've featured the sink-urinal and a better travel neck pillow. (Do you have an innovation to share? Use this quick form.)

In our "Weekly Innovation" blog series, we explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Previously we've featured the sink-urinal and a better travel neck pillow. (Do you have an innovation to share? Use this quick form.)

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